Climate Action

New study finds public in favour of cigarette-style plastic warnings

A new independent study, carried out by Sky Ocean Rescue, has found that there has been a shift in the public’s perception of plastic.

  • 08 November 2018
  • Rachel Cooper

A new independent study, carried out by Sky Ocean Rescue, has found that there has been a shift in the public’s perception of plastic.

The study, carried out in the UK, found that 7 out of 10 Brits say that common single-use plastics should carry a cigarette-style warning label.

7 in 10 claim they have reduced their plastic usage in the past year because of the impact on the environment and its oceans. A further 4 in 10 said they felt embarrassed being spotted with single-use plastic items.

Fiona Ball, Sky Group Head of Inspirational Business and Sky Ocean Rescue, said: “Our new research reveals that there has never been a stronger desire from people to make positive changes to reduce their single-use plastic footprint and start saving our oceans. We’ve partnered with Project 0 and some of the best-known names in the UK today to create a range of reusable products that not only look good but do good.”

Following the study, Sky Ocean Rescue have launched their new Pass on Plastic range designed to decrease single-use plastics.

The range, launched last night at an exclusive event, has been designed by famous faces including Cara Delavigne, Harry Kane, Ronnie Wood and Princess Eugenie of York. They all have created a unique design to promote a plastic-free message.

The range includes a reusable bottles, cups and cutlery as well as organic tote bags and beeswax wrap, an alternative to cling film. The items are available to buy online and in the Soho Pass on Plastic pop-up shop which will be open for two months, while stock lasts.

The profits of the range will go towards initiatives protecting ocean health, this will include Sky Ocean Rescue’s partnership with WWF-UK which helps to safeguard marine protecting areas.

Cara Delavigne said: “My design represents how the plastic we use is suffocating marine life and causing so much damage. I hope that you’ll join me in making a change.”

Photograph: Sky Ocean Resuce