Climate Action

Puerto Rico launches new wind farm

A wind farm consisting of 13 turbines is under construction at Naguabo in eastern Puerto Rico and is nearly halfway to completion. It is estimated that up to 9,000 homes could be powered by the new wind farm.

  • 24 August 2012
  • A wind farm consisting of 13 turbines is under construction at Naguabo in eastern Puerto Rico and is nearly halfway to completion. It is estimated that up to 9,000 homes could be powered by the new wind farm. Spanish company Gestamp Wind is constructing the farm which is expected to generate electricity for residents beginning in October. Over 90% of Puerto Rico's energy is derived from fossil fuelsFossil fuels and approximately 70% of the country's electricity is generated from imported oil. Puerto Rico therefore pays an unusually high premium for electricity and the nation’s leaders have described this dependence on foreign oil as the greatest barrier to economic development in the country.

A wind farm consisting of 13 turbines is under construction at Naguabo in eastern Puerto Rico and is nearly halfway to completion. It is estimated that up to 9,000 homes could be powered by the new wind farm.

Spanish company Gestamp Wind is constructing the farm which is expected to generate electricity for residents beginning in October.

Over 90% of Puerto Rico's energy is derived from fossil fuelsFossil fuels and approximately 70% of the country's electricity is generated from imported oil.

Puerto Rico therefore pays an unusually high premium for electricity and the nation’s leaders have described this dependence on foreign oil as the greatest barrier to economic development in the country.

The Puerto Rican government has goals of generating 12% of its energy from renewable sources by 2015 and the goal for 2020 is 15%.

According to the report about 33% of Puerto Rico’s 2006 total energy consumption could have been met by a combination of solar and wind power, based on the potential for each of those clean energy technologies. While 2006 obviously will probably be different than 2012 and going forward, at least there is one example of the impact clean energy could have.