Climate Action

Burberry launches new sustainable nylon collection

Burberry has announced the launch of their new sustainable collection made from Econyl, a sustainable nylon.

  • 06 August 2019
  • Rachel Cooper

Burberry has announced the launch of their new sustainable collection made from Econyl, a sustainable nylon.

The high-end fashion brand has launched a new capsule collection made from Econyl, a sustainable nylon yarn made from regenerated fishing nets, fabric scraps and industrial plastic.

The new collection includes a reinvention of Burberry’s lightweight classic car coat and is just one of the 50 disruptions Burberry is making throughout its supply chain to create a more circular fashion industry.

Pam Batty, VP Corporate Responsibility at Burberry, said: “Exploring and using innovative materials that foster circularity is central to creating a more sustainable fashion industry. We are proud to use the  ECONYL®  yarn in this collection because it shows how we can actively tackle a problem like plastic waste and create beautiful, luxury products at the same time.”

Giulio Bonazzi, CEO at Aquafil said: “We are delighted to collaborate with Burberry for this capsule collection. We believe innovative fibers like ECONYL® regenerated nylon are the future and are proud to support brands who use our yarns, transforming waste into incredible designs and raising the profile and possibilities of a more circular fashion system.” 

Fast-fashion has emerged as an environmentally damaging ‘hobby’ with recent reports outing the industry as being wasteful and unsustainable.

The textile industry is the second-biggest consumer of water, generating around 20 per cent of the world’s wastewater.  Not only does the fashion industry contribute to water waste, it also contributes heavily to microfiber pollution.

This is not the first time Burberry has committed to a sustainable future. Last year, they announced that they would stop destroying old products to align with a circular economy.

The brand teamed up with sustainable luxury company Elvis & Kresse to ensure that over the next five years 120 tonnes of leather off-cuts will be transformed into new products.

Photograph: Burberry