Climate Action

A museum exhibition dedicated to sustainable packaging

Recognising that sustainability is one of the major challenges for brands and consumers, the Museum of Brands, Packaging, and Advertising in London is launching a new exhibition exploring the latest innovations in sustainable packaging.

  • 09 January 2018
  • Websolutions

Recognising that sustainability is one of the major challenges for brands and consumers, the Museum of Brands, Packaging, and Advertising in London is launching a new exhibition exploring the latest innovations in sustainable packaging.

The display will present a selection of recent initiatives designed by brands to reduce the negative environmental effect of packaging to the ecosystems

The exhibition is set to open on 22 February.  

It will include a series of case studies and products from a number of retailers and brands, including Waitrose, Marks & Spencer, Lush, and Fairy. It will also present examples from companies specialising in sustainable packaging solutions, such as Vegware, Sulpac, and Elopak.

Examples of sustainable solutions will range from packs created from ocean waste and plant-based materials to edible packaging and upcycling.

The exhibition results from the museum’s partnership with ThePackHub, a packaging innovation consultancy specialising in the delivery of technical and innovative packaging options to brand owners, retailers, and  suppliers.

Chris Griffin, CEO of Museum of Brands said: “Sustainability is a core subject for today’s society and one the Museum updates on and presents to audiences regularly”.

“This exhibit allows us to explore the very latest technological advances in sustainable packaging that are available to consumers with the aim of stimulating further debate on complex questions surrounding sustainability”, he added.

The aim of the museum is to educate the public on the history of design, packaging, and advertising. It tells the stories of global brands by showcasing their packaging strategies and communications from the Victorian times to the present.

You can learn more about the museum here.  

Image credits to the Museum of Brands