Climate Action

25% drop in the carbon footprint of Scottish households

New analysis from WWF Scotland has revealed that the carbon footprint of households in Scotland has fallen by an average of 25% since Scotland’s Climate Change Act was passed in 2009.

  • 05 January 2018
  • Websolutions

New analysis from WWF Scotland has revealed that the carbon footprint of households in Scotland has fallen by an average of 25% since Scotland’s Climate Change Act was passed in 2009.

Improvements to buildings, greater uptake in energy efficiency and the significant rise in renewable energy has helped reduce the overall carbon footprint.

The environmental charity analysed government statistics and found that between 2009-2015 carbon emissions have fallen from 2.46 to 1.84 tonnes per person.

Scotland benefits from having a large supply of available wind power, which makes up over 40% of the UK’s total capacity, the vast majority being onshore wind.

This often leads to times when turbines could theoretically supply more than the country’s energy use. For example, on an October Monday last year, Scottish wind farms produced 86,467 megawatt hours (MWh), while homes, businesses and industry used only 41,866MWh.

Renewables in total now provide over half of Scotland’s electricity generation.

Gina Hanrahan, Acting Head of Policy at WWF Scotland said,

“The Scottish Parliament’s first Climate Change Act put us at the forefront of a global energy transition. These figures show that individuals across Scotland and governments at every level have played a part in cutting the climate damage of our home energy usage. When it comes to cutting our emissions, and protecting ourselves, the places and nature we hold dear from the worst effects of climate change, we all need to continue to do our bit”

The Scottish Government has already set ambitious targets on its journey to a low-carbon economy. In January 2017, it committed to delivering 50% of all Scotland’s energy from renewables by 2030. It also plans to bring forward a target of net zero greenhouse gas emissions by 2050 at the latest, with an interim target of 77% by 2030.

Ms. Hanrahan added:  “This analysis shows Scotland’s low-carbon transition is working, but we must step up our efforts. A new Climate Change Bill this year is an opportunity to double down on our commitments to make our homes more energy efficient, to increase the use of renewables to heat homes, and put Scotland on the path to a zero-carbon future.”



Image Credit: Gary Denham